7 Problems when hiring a moving company

People often get stressed out when they are to move stuff from one place to another because it is an overwhelming thing to do most especially if you got the whole house and a whole old life to pack and move on to another place to start again. Being aware of the problems though will give you clues and be ready with the cons for you to be prepared for everything. SO the following are a list of at least 7 of some challenges you are to encounter when you are to hire a moving company compared to packing everything up DIY.

The very first thing that you must consider is the price. Yes, honestly, hiring movers can be very expensive. This is because you will hire an entire team to do the stuff for you. You will enjoy the fact that there will be no heavy loads or exhausting feeling of packing every tiny stuff you got home, but you must also make sure that you have already prepared a sufficient budget for the moving day to come.

Another thing that might worry you about moving is the control on how they do the process of packing and how they take care of your stuff. Unlike when you are to pack things yourself, slowly but you know your stuff very well, surely you can pack everything with care though may take some time to do so.

Then one thing, moving companies might sometimes be not available most especially with the nearest in your area if you don’t book ahead. If you are in a hurry to move, you have to check those that are in a kind of far from where you live, and that would mean an additional charge.

Quality work will also be an issue sometimes because you can’t have any control over how things are handled. Some workers might find their work usual and do things fast which is good but will damage some goods.

You will also cringe most especially when you see that movers will use substandard packing materials for they work in practicality unlike you packing your stuff, you can make sure that you use heavy duty materials.

You might also worry about the honesty of some employee, and that will give you an uneasy feeling knowing that some people are touching and packing your stuff without your presence yet you may also supervise them if you want most especially when it comes to expensive stuff.

Last, the driver’s speed when traveling your stuff for you will never control over how will they carry the goods. Hiring movers will make things as easy as waiting for everything to be transferred to the new house yet you can never see how well they carry your stuff and if they take things as easy as they could so nothing will get damaged.

So now, you have an idea of what to deal with when hiring a moving company.

Easing the Pain Communities Must Act to Heal Wounds of African-American Boys and Young Men

The plight of young African-American males can best be described
by the aforementioned definitions of pain, which in many ways
summarize their life experiences. Too many young black men endure
severe daily emotional stress or anguish, which they often strive to avoid
by any means necessary. Their daily walk comprises many perceptions
or assumptions that paint them as causes of trouble and sources of
discomfort or unhappiness. The weight of these perceptions and beliefs
are often unbearable and leave many of these boys and young men
feeling hopeless, confused and trapped in a society that does not value
them.

These feelings of worthlessness have been exacerbated by the
recent case and court decision regarding Trayvon Martin. The series of
events that led to his death as well as the assumptions and stereotypes
about African-American teenage boys and young men were at the center
of countless debates across the country. Are all young African-American
men viewed as shiftless, suspicious and dangerous? Under what circumstances is it safe to
wear a hoodie or to question why you are being followed? These and other questions are in the
minds of countless African-American youth as they attempt to persevere through a tumultuous
life journey in America.
President Barack Obama in a July 19, 2013, speech cited the Trayvon Martin tragedy
as emblematic of a broader American problem regarding African-American teenage boys and
young men. He challenged the nation to figure out what could be done to give this specific
population a sense that their country cares about them and values them and is willing to
invest in them. These are powerful and potentially prescriptive words that should not be
left for political banter. Only through sound political leadership and bold public policies can
the daunting challenges of young African-American males be fully identified, addressed and
resolved.

Immigration Path to Prosperity or Calamity?

It has often been said that the United States is a country of immigrants. Since the
turn of the 20th century, hundreds of thousands of Irish, Italian, Slovenian and Hungarian
immigrants, among others, have found their way to cities such as Cleveland, Ohio, to start
new lives. America was seen as a melting pot of backgrounds, where economic opportunity
and good fortune bubbled within reach of anyone willing to take a chance and pursue a
better future for themselves and their families. Given this welcoming past, it is quite curious
that, since 1955, “nine national surveys have shown an overwhelming majority of U.S.
citizens opposed to increasing immigration levels” (Fallon, 1996, p. 141). There has been
and continues to be a debate in this country about the impact of immigration on the U.S.
economy and society. Significant amounts of research have provided both proponents and
opponents of immigration with data to buttress their respective arguments. However, in the
final analysis, it is difficult to dispute that immigration provides – or has the potential to
provide – an economic benefit to our gross domestic product (GDP) and contributes to the
long-term stability of our society.

As Northeast Ohio begins the second decade of the 21st century, local political,
business and community leaders are engaged in a concerted effort to redesign and recast the
future of the region economically and socially. Several initiatives are currently under way
to improve educational attainment for students from preschool through college graduation,
stimulate business and economic growth, and enhance the quality of life for people in
the region. These efforts include early-childhood development programs, innovative and
career-oriented public schools, and scholarship and mentorship programs, to reference a
few. Although noble, these efforts have generated marginal results at best, particularly for
marginalized immigrant and minority populations.

Policy Bridge History

PolicyBridge is a 501c (3) non-partisan public policy think tank based in Northeast Ohio with a legislative office in Washington DC. Our key objective is to monitor urban policy issues and inform regional public policy debates by framing issues of relevance to the minority community.


FOUNDERS; RANDELL MCSHEPARD, MARK BATSON AND TIMOTHY GOLER

Randell McShepard – Board Chairman (Click here for Bio)
RMcShepard@policy-bridge.org

Gregory L. Brown(Click here for Bio)
gbrown@policy-bridge.org


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Gregory L. Brown
Executive Director PolicyBridge

Jeffery Johnson          MSNBC Contributor & TheGRIO, White House Correspondent

Mittie Davis-Jones, Ph.D.
Director – Urban Child Research Center
Cleveland State University

Craig Follins, Ph.D. 
President, Olive-Harvey College

Rhonda Y. Williams, Ph.D. Director, Social Justice Institute/Alliance & Associate Professor, Department of History, Case Western Reserve University

Terri Hamilton-Brown (Board Treasurer)
Consultant

Valerie McCall
Chief of Government Affairs
Cleveland City Hall – Office of the Mayor

Randell McShepard (Board Chairman)
Vice President of Public Affairs
RPM International Inc.

Steven A. Minter
Executive-In Residence
Cleveland State University

Ronald V. Johnson
Vice President & Associate Counsel – Law Group KeyBank NA

Scott D. Roulston 
Former CEO and President
Fairport Asset Management, LLC

Sharon Sobol Jordan      President & CEO
Center for Families and Children

Steven Sims
Director of Office of Small Business
Regional Transit Authority

Eddie Taylor
President & CEO
Taylor Oswald Companies

Danny Wiliams
Executive Director
The Cleveland Free Clinic